Category: Politics

Obamacare Sign-Up Percentages in Memphis

This is really cool.

From Kaiser Family Foundation, a tool to find the number of people by zip code (or roughly by zip code … read the fine print) who signed up for Obamacare through the exchanges in 2014 and 2015.

For example, in zip code 38103:

2015: 5,300 people signed up out of 12,800 potential enrollees. (42%)
2014: 3,600 people signed up out of 13,300 potential enrollees. (27%)

And in a world where hard facts on Obamacare are so difficult to find — given the politics and complexity of the issue — Kaiser has all kinds of interesting data. For instance, while Tennessee premiums are up 38%, they’re up “only”  1.5% after tax credits are factored in.

A few 2015 Memphis election stats

In conjunction with Bill Dries’ Memphis News cover story and precinct breakdown, here are some prettified, interactive statistics from the 2015 Memphis mayoral race, based on the Shelby County Election Commission’s unaudited data.

231,440 Tennesseans enroll in health coverage through health insurance marketplace

According to the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, 231,440 Tennesseans enrolled in or renewed coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace as of February 22.

The agency also says that even though open enrollment has ended, there’s a new time-limited special enrollment period for this year’s tax-filing season.

Between March 15 and April 30, uninsured Tennesseans who are subject to the fine for not having health coverage because they didn’t understand how it would affect them have another chance to enroll in a plan for 2015. Families or individuals who meet certain income requirements or other circumstances may also qualify for low cost coverage through Tennessee’s TennCare program, which has year-round enrollment.

For question about health coverage or to schedule a free appointment with an enrollment assister, visit or call the hotline at (844) 644-5443.

Everything you need to know before you vote

Right-click to download your sample ballot.

Click here to view/download your sample ballot.

Early voting is underway through Oct. 30 in advance of the Nov. 4 election day. Here is the sample ballot from the Shelby County Election Commission for you to mark with your choices and use when you vote. (You are going to vote, aren’t you?)

Here are a few more things you need to know:

• WHAT: A few highlights from this year’s ballot: the races for governor, U.S. Senate and House; four state Constitutional amendments; and, depending on where you live, wine in grocery stores (Memphis, Arlington, Bartlett, Collierville, Germantown and Millington) or liquor by the drink (Lakeland).

• WHEN: Mondays-Fridays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 30 

• WHERE: 21 polling sites across Shelby County (view the list here). You can vote at any of the 21 locations, no matter where you live.

• WHAT YOU NEED: State or federal photo ID – driver’s license, passport, military ID, etc.

Want even more info? Check out the Shelby County Election Commission website at And follow @tdnpols for early voting updates, election night returns, and all the other political news you need to know.

Your sample ballot for the August 2014 elections

Right-click to save a copy of the Aug. 7 sample ballot

Aug. 7 sample ballot PDF

Just in time for the opening of early voting Friday, July 18, here is the sample ballot for the Aug. 7 election. It features the state and federal primary elections, county general elections and nonpartisan judicial races that come along once every eight years to make this the longest ballot of any election cycle in Shelby County politics.

Unlike the many sample ballots you will be handed between now and Aug. 7, ours comes without any endorsements. So do what you will with the PDF to use as your own voting guide for the “big ballot.”

It’s also printed in the July 11 edition of The Daily News, if you want to do this old school and need a hard copy to have and hold and mark up.

We’ll be tweeting the daily early voter turnout and election night returns at @tdnpols. And we are happy to answer any basic questions about what can be a confusing ballot at times, with primaries, general elections and a few judicial retention races all together.