On the CVS Fight

Preserving the individuality of Midtown is one of the most oft-cited reasons of preservationists and neighborhood supporters in opposing developments like CVS’ plan to replace the church building at the corner of Union and Cooper with a drug store.

It’s a version of the same fight that saw preservationists and neighborhood supporters fight to keep a grocery store out of Overton Square and to delay Chick-fil-A building a Midtown restaurant for months until the eatery agreed to preserve – a wall.

The reasons behind those preservation fights are understandable. People want Midtown populated with businesses that don’t exist in the suburbs.

It sometimes gets lost in that discussion, though, that such businesses actually need to be patronized to survive.

I can’t help but wonder where some of this same passion was when:

Square Foods was forced to close its doors in 2008;
Sweet Bistro closed in 2009;
Dish closed its doors earlier this year;
the House of Mews struggled financially to the point its managing director was preparing to sell her house when a benefactor stepped up to offer aid;
Lux closed, then was offered a better location and, by chance, was able to reopen.

Comments

  1. Wintermute says:

    Sanity returns to the Council.

Dansette

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