U of M Area Inks Self-Serve TCBY

Make sure to look out for this Friday’s Inked to read about the latest self-serve frozen yogurt shop, planned for the Poplar Avenue and Highland Road area by the University of Memphis.

This TCBY will be the only Memphis frozen yogurt that meets the requirement of the “Super Fro-Yo” classification.

The article will also tackle how long the trend will last.

“We’re about to get saturated and we’ve still got a lot more coming,” said a co-owner of the franchise.

In the mean time, check out these past Daily News articles about the yogurt craze:

The Newsiest Blog Post I’ve Ever Written

Honors, New Roles and Speaking Out:

Morgan Keegan was the ninth leading underwriter of municipal bonds in the country for 2010. First Tennessee Bank won honors in the 2010 Greenwich Excellence Awards for U.S. middle market banking. Net income almost doubled in 2010 for Renasant Bank.

Also:

1) Amy Weirich was privately sworn in Tuesday as Shelby County’s new District Attny. Gen. Her predecessor Bill Gibbons said she has a “tough but fair temperament.” She told The Daily News, for an article in Thursday’s edition, that she loves representing the community in the courtroom – which she’s done for 20 years – she loves the unpredictability of her new office and she plans to waste no time in fighting “anything that makes people feel less safe in our community.”

2) Finally, the Wall Street Journal’s Wednesday edition offers a snapshot of the CVS-preservationist battle in Memphis involving the Union Ave. Methodist Church. The paper quotes the church’s former minister as saying members agreed to use some of the proceeds from the sale to CVS for social projects. The paper also quotes June West, executive director of Memphis Heritage Inc., as saying “greed won over the community.”

No More Red Envelopes?

I have covered the travails of Blockbuster locally, since the Memphis-area stores are run by what once was the largest Blockbuster franchise operation in the country.

Blockbuster filed Chapter 11 late last year, and a few stores in Memphis have closed since then.

Here’s the latest one. Ironically, after the bankruptcy filing became public, the franchise group wrote a letter assuring customers it would be “business as usual” at that store, and that the franchise group is separate from the corporate parent.

The reason for the rental giant’s troubles are no secret. People want to press a button and rent/buy movies from their couch. It’s that simple.

An interesting side note – Netflix raised considerable ire in the blogosphere over the past few days when it gently suggested it is headed toward a DVD-less, primarily online distribution model.

Norris and Haslam on MLK Day

A busy holiday in the city and the National Civil Rights Museum seemed to be the epicenter for much of that action.

As is the case every year on the federal holiday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., thousands have come to the museum built on the site where King was assassinated in 1968.

Among the visitors was the new governor of Tennessee, Bill Haslam, with both mayors and several state legislators from Big Shelby in tow. That included state Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville.

The definition of Norris’s role in the current schools standoff depends on who you talk to. Norris, himself, describes himself as a mediator between the two school systems — not by choice — but because mayors Wharton and Luttrell — asked him.

We’ll have an updated web story posted this afternoon with the quotes and other more precise points. But Norris tells us Tuesday’s special meeting of the Memphis City Schools board will be key to whether he pushes ahead with legislation that would make the consolidation of the two school systems a longer process requiring participation by Shelby County voters outside Memphis.

The MCS board is considering a compromise offered by the Shelby County school system that is different than the legislation Norris is sponsoring in Nashville. Norris insists that his legislation puts on record what is already in state law for such a consolidation including participation by county voters outside Memphis.

He also acknowledges there is disagreement on this very crucial point and that the disagreement may be the point where this fast moving dispute produces a lawsuit and a court, or several courts, decide the point.

One of the Shelby County school board’s attorneys, Chuck Cagle of Nashville, has already told that board that planning commissions similar to the ones in the compromise and in Norris’s legislation apply to different kinds of consolidations, not one that is the result of a school system charter surrender.

Cagle said there are no ground rules for how a transition to a countywide school system works in this case which is why he advised his clients to begin planning for the transition now as if such a merger is inevitable.

Haslam, meanwhile, continues to express hope this will be resolved locally without his new administration having to wade into the fray before they’ve even unpacked their boxes.

Haslam has filled in all of his important cabinet positions with the exception of a commissioner of education. He has appointed the state’s coordinator of federally funded Race to the Top education reforms to be the interim commissioner. But Haslam said today he hopes to have a permanent choice for the post this month.

We also talked with him about the executive order he issued over the weekend that changes financial disclosure requirements for members of his cabinet to match those of the Tennessee legislature. It’s a different and less specific standard in terms of dollar amounts disclosed than the standards under former Gov. Phil Bredesen.

Redneck Bank … “Where Banking’s Funner”

In Memphis, the Bank of Bartlett cooks popcorn and bakes cookies for customers. CitiFinancial hosts customer appreciation days with plates of candy and other goodies. First Tennessees have hosted “community days” with fun events for the whole family.

None have actually gone this far – an online “Redneck Bank” with a giant horse on the home page that promises “Yessiree, we’re a member of the FDIC.”

And you click on an outhouse to go to your personal account information.

Dansette

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