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Cruising the Blues Highway

Bart Madson, managing editor of motorcycleusa.com, wrote an interesting article in October 2008 about traveling down the highways of the Mississippi Delta and visits to Blues haunts.
This is the type of road trip adventure that the owner of Southern Thunder Harley-Davidson wants to promote.
Read the article: www.motorcycle-usa.com/309/1195/Motorcycle-Article/Cruising-the-Mississippi-Blues-Highways.aspx

Fasten your seatbelts

In its effort to see FedEx Express employees fall under the National Labor Relations Act and not the Railway Labor Act – thereby making the company easier to unionize – the International Brotherhood of Teamsters has launched a new campaign claiming that “FedEx drivers aren’t pilots.”

The website includes a video and written material expressing Teamsters’ opinion that the Memphis-based shipper shouldn’t be classified as an airline because its numerous drivers don’t fly planes and its trucks don’t have flight attendants.

“FedEx bought its special status through political arm-twisting, plain and simple,” Teamsters general president Jim Hoffa said in a statement. “But now Congress must do the right thing and close the loophole. Americans are tired of giveaways to corporations, especially to a company that can’t even be upfront about what it really does.”

FedEx, which has long fought the efforts of Teamsters, is working to maintain its status under the Railway Labor Act, legislation that makes it nearly impossible for unions to grab a foothold.

The company has said it will cancel a $6.7 billion order of Boeing freighters if the labor reclassification occurs with an amendment of the FAA’s reauthorization bill.

“Friend” the Fed

The folks at the central bank have hopped on the social media bandwagon. You can now follow via Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Flickr the goings-on at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, the regional Fed bank whose district encompasses Memphis. Details at www.stlouisfed.org/followthefed.

Blame Canada?

A whistleblower has filed suit in Ontario, Canada, alleging that FedEx Canada – a subsidiary of Memphis-based FedEx Corp. – is letting shipments cross the U.S-Canada border without the proper customs paperwork.

That could potentially allow dangerous goods into this country – at a time when most eyes are focused on the U.S.-Mexico border to the south.

Details of the suit, filed with the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, can be found at this website.

Here’s an excerpt:

Consequently, this class of shipments would likely include a high percentage of controlled goods (defined as strategic, dangerous or regulated, such as nuclear dual-use technology, dangerous chemicals or U.S. goods being shipped from Canada). According to Canadian Customs regulations, these controlled goods are monitored closely, in part, to assure that they don’t pose a security threat to other nations, such as the United States.

The still-pending lawsuit, filed by a former Federal Express Canada Ltd. customs department employee named Nazir Ghany, alleges that FedEx Canada has engaged in “unlawful activities” that violate the Canadian Customs Act. As a consequence of reporting these alleged violations, Ghany contends he was demoted and subjected to retaliation by FedEx Canada management — to the point where he claims he had no choice but to resign from his job.

Meet Patrick Moynihan

I wrote a story in Thursday’s Daily News about Patrick Moynihan. He used to work in Memphis as a trader for Allenberg Cotton Co., then left in the 1990s to devote himself to missionary work in Haiti. He’s also the brother of Brian Moynihan, the president and CEO of Bank of America.

Memphians represent a solid chunk of the support base of Moynihan’s mission work.

To read more about him, check out this profile of the brothers in Brown University Alumni Magazine, “The Banker & The Missionary”.

Dansette

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