Category: Other

Upcoming tribute concerts for Memphis music legends

A few tribute concerts to late Memphis music icons are in the works.

Coming up April 22 is “Press/Play: A celebration of John Fry and John Hampton,” happening April 22 at the Levitt Shell in honor of Fry, the founder of Ardent Studios, and Ardent engineer and producer Hampton.

They died within days of each other in December.

Exactly one month later, meanwhile, on May 22 at the Hi-Tone, a Chris Bell tribute concert will be held. Bell was the guitarist and songsmith, along with Alex Chilton, who helped launch the legendary power pop act Big Star.

For that, a band led by Ardent’s Adam Hill will perform songs from Bell’s solo record “I am the cosmos” plus Big Star’s first record “#1 record.” Guests will include Van Duren, Richard Rosebrough and more.

Van Horn leaves TV for Crye-Leike

Meteorologist Tim Van Horn has left WMC-TV Action News 5 and entered the world of real estate.

Van Horn has left the news desk behind and joined Crye-Leike Realtors on a full-time basis as an affiliate broker at the company’s Quail Hollow office.  Van Horn’s last day with WMC was on Sunday, Jan 11, and the veteran meteorologist began working with Crye-Leike on Monday, Jan.  12.

“It’s a combination of doing something that I’ve been wanting and preparing to do, a chance to help others, and see a lot more of my family,” Van Horn, who began working at the station in 1999, wrote on his blog. “I can’t lie. I am excited. I already like the new boss. It’s me.”

Van Horn will be assisting buyers and sellers in Shelby, Fayette and Tipton Counties. He is a member of the National Association of Realtors, Tennessee Association of Realtors and Memphis Area Association of Realtors.

Cinematic City

CBS News posted this stunning time-lapse video of Memphis. The video, made by Jason Allen Lee, gives you a whole new perspective of life in the Bluff City. Thanks to Memphis mayor A C Wharton Jr. for pointing out the video on his Facebook page.

Mural planned for underpass on Cooper Street

Volunteers and Memphis College of Art students hope  to liven up the underpass on Cooper Street at Peabody Park with a vibrant mural.

A group led by Betsy Robinson has launched a fundraising campaign on ioby to raise the $1,655 needed to bring the mural to life. The group has raised $750 so far and says work on the mural, which would be located on the railroad underpass on Cooper between Higbee Avenue and Central Avenue, could begin June 1 and be completed by August 1.

“So many people drive under this forgotten trestle on a daily basis,” the group stated in its fundraising announcement.  “It is dark and dingy, yet it is in the center of a great neighborhood.  By painting a colorful mural the aesthetics and esteem of the neighborhood and its members will be increased.”

Projects like the proposed mural, while they may seem like minor improvements in the grand scheme of things, can have a profound impact. In 2001, the Cooper-Young Historic District trestle, which hovers over Cooper near Central, was dedicated. The 150-foot long steel sculpture depicting homes and businesses  in the neighborhood has since served as the  “front door” to Cooper-Young.

Speaking of Cooper-Young, the place is booming.

The Cooper Young Business Association says activity in the neighborhood is at an all-time high, with 187 businesses, including 16 that have opened since January, operating in the area. The business association recently hung 26 banners, featuring images of Cooper-Young business owners and patrons, on street poles in the area, launched a new logo for the neighborhood and made improvements to the gazebo area at the intersection of Cooper and Young Avenue.

 

 

 

Are Schools Really “Failing” — And Are They Being “Reformed”?

A very interesting, cautionary opinion piece from American Journalism Review about how the media covers schools.

http://www.ajr.org/Article.asp?id=5280

We’ve spent a lot of time covering the schools in recent years in the paper and on the Behind the Headlines show. The reform efforts of Superintendent Kriner Cash, the Gates Foundation efforts, the rise of charter schools, and of course the pending consolidation of city and county schools, all have occupied a lot of space. For good reason, I think.

After reading this, though, I’m frantically trying to think about where, when and how often I’ve fallen into some of the easy lines described by Farhi.

Two items from the story that stuck out to me:

“’The discussion [of the state of schools] is quite simplistic. I’m not sure why exactly. My suspicion is that the media has trouble with complexity.'”

“In 2011, the percentage of parents who gave their children’s school an A grade was at its highest ever (37 percent), whereas only 1 percent of respondents rated the nation’s schools that way. Why the disparity in perceived quality? Gallup asked people about that, too. Mostly, it was because people knew about their local schools through direct experience. They only learned about the state of education nationally through the news media.”

 

Dansette

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