Study: Obesity costs women more

Researchers at George Washington University have assessed the costs of obesity and determined that women pay more for being overweight.

The study looked at medical expenses and lost wages. The cost to a man was $2,646 a year, while a woman paid out $4,879.

Read about the study in The New York Times:
www.nytimes.com/2010/09/28/health/research/28disparities.html?_r=1&ref=health

Randstad exec sees job growth

Linda Galipeau, president of Randstad Staffing and In-House Solutions, said she sees early signs of a “magnificent” recovery in Memphis.

Speaking in brief remarks at a breakfast meeting of the Greater Memphis Chamber on Thursday, she advised companies to do a better job of engaging employees to hold onto top talent and avoid turnover.

“Very often, Memphis, Nashville and Atlanta, these cities are the first to come down because the logistics and manufacturing industries get hit first,” she said. “That’s precisely what we saw at the beginning of late 2007.”

But now the Southeast is where the demand for manpower is rising. Staffing companies see these emploment trends before they emerge in official economic reports, she said.

“Beginning last year – about the middle and through to right now – we’ve seen magnificent recovery levels in the Memphis market and in the other Southern markets that we work. This is a very good point in the economy and we see it before it shows up in the greater data.”

Defensive medicine cost debated

There are several studies, reports and assertions being bandied about regarding the overall cost of defensive medicine.

That’s how much extra the health care system spends for tests that may not be necessary, but ones that doctors prescribe to protect themselves from a possible malpractice suit.

National Public Radio reported on some studies that are in the current issue of Health Affairs magazine.

www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129706676

Fed looks at small biz lending

Now that the Federal Reserve Bank has listened to bankers and small business owners talk about tight lending, what will it do to help solve the problem?
The St. Louis Fed recently released a list of “key takeaways” gathered from discussions held in late winter and early spring with business and community leaders from Memphis, Little Rock, Louisville and St. Louis. The information on small business lending problems was forwarded to the Board of Governors.
“The next step will be to bring together lenders, technical-assistance providers and alternative financial providers to explore the possibility of developing a loan fund for the St. Louis region,” the Fed said in a press release. “Several meeting participants have expressed their interest in being part of the ongoing dialogue.”
Read the list of six key takeaways and the full press release:

www.stlouisfed.org/publications/cb/articles/?id=1969

Feds release small biz scorecard

The U.S. government granted a record $96.8 billion in contracts to small businesses during its 2009 fiscal year, but still fell short of its goal.
The figure amounted to 21.89 percent of contracts when the goal was 23 percent.
However, it surpassed the goal set for small disadvantaged businesses. Contracts awarded to those businesses totaled $33.5 billion, which was 7.57 percent of contracts. The goal was 5 percent.
The figures were revealed with the release of the U.S. Small Business Administration’s procurement scorecard.
The scorecard rated agencies from A to F.
Homeland Security got an A, Housing and Urban Development got a B, NASA got a C, the Department of Justice got a D and the National Science Foundation got a F.
To see how all 24 agencies rated visit www.sba.gov/aboutsba/sbaprograms/goals/SCORECARD2009.html

Dansette

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